Neither food nor any supplements influence penis growth or size. That’s the reason why all the so called penis pills offered on the internet simply don’t work at all, don’t believe all the fake promises. All those pills increase the blood flow only, which may cause a harder erections, but the effect instantly stops once you stop taking those pills. So, a lot of wasted money for non-permanent effect. It’s tempting, the sellers of those pills will show you doctors smiling from their websites, pseudo scientific studies from India they paid for, raving testimonials from famous pornstars but it’s just a huge scam scheme. It’s an extremely profitable business, selling cheap herbs for astronomical prices, combined with often shady long term recurring billing that’s hard to cancel. Bottom line: Penis pills are pure “snake oil” often made of cheap ingredients importet from China, overpriced and even potentially harmful for you health. Especially the contamination with heavy metals and carcinogenic colorings is a possible problem. Some sellers claim their products are manufactured in FDA approved laboratories, but this doesn’t mean the product itself is controlled by the FDA, like prescription drugs.

Those who do not like the idea of taking a tablet every day can take liquid supplements. Liquid supplements contain the same ingredients found in the tablets. Instead of taking a single capsule every day, you simply drink a small amount of the liquid. Nutritional supplements come in several flavors, including a traditional flavor and a citrus flavor. You can drink the male enhancement liquid straight from the bottle, but some men prefer mixing the liquid supplement with water or another drink. The liquid products have the same benefits as the tablets and capsules.
Women who prefer deep vaginal stimulation want larger than average penises [2]. Deep vaginal stimulation is the path to the desirable vaginal orgasm which differs from the clitoral orgasm she can get by herself any time she wants. One study showed that a “considerable percentage” of the women participants felt size of an erection was important [3] for her sexual satisfaction.
Of all the sex-related topics out there, the one surrounded by the most myth is definitely penis enlargement. If you’re a guy who’s ever checked their spam folder, you’ll see reams and reams of emails promising more inches with pills, creams, surgery and more. Don’t trust them, obviously — however, there are so many who are trying to sell people on having a bigger penis that there must be more to it, right?
This penis enlargement technique is basically as it name sounds. The Strong Stretch technique is designed to improve the length of ligaments and tissues attach to the penis. The good news is beginners can easily gain 0.5 to 1 inch within few weeks by using this technique alone. However, it is important to keep in mind that this technique has nothing to do with the thickness (girth) of the penis.
So, does a bigger penis mean better sex? The simple answer is, no, after all, ‘it’s what you do with it that counts’. Regardless of how many times that cliché is used, many men firmly believe that their penis is too small and that if they had a bigger penis, they would have more confidence in relationships and be better lovers. This kind of belief probably expresses much of how you feel about yourself and your body and how you think others perceive you. Often, doubts and feelings of shame and inadequacy about penis shape and size stem from comments bandied about in school changing rooms, during puberty. Furthermore, messages we receive from the media and society can all too often link masculinity, power and virility to penis size, thus re-enforcing this self-doubt and poor body image. If you have wavering self-confidence and poor body image, these kinds of comments can deepen those feelings and lead to the belief that, ‘your penis is inadequate. Therefore, you are inadequate’. Sadly, this kind of misbelief can lead men to avoid dating, relationships and any kind of sexual intimacy, for fear of rejection or humiliation.
According to the website of one such product, the safe application of traction encourages tissue cells to divide and multiply, a process called cytokinesis. Over time and with great effort this will lead to tissue growth. The FDA considers these low-risk devices (Class 1) and so provides only general controls intended to be followed by manufacturers.
Not all operations leave happy customers – infections and scarring are both potential side-effects (“This is the same as an operation of any kind,” Viel says). Some men report a decline in angle after the suspensory ligament is cut, but according to David Ralph, a professor of urology at UCL, “By and large, patients don’t complain about that. The operation doesn’t change the erect length at all – this is only for men who have anxiety about how they look in the changing rooms. The average increase in size is 1.3cm, less than the diameter of a 1p coin. In my clinics, I show patients one of these and ask if they still think it is worth it. Less than 5% decide to, and of those who do, the satisfaction rate is just 20%.”
I ask for his pre-op dimensions. He doesn’t want his exact measurements reported, but they are surprising: while flaccid, he was smaller than most men; erect, his penis grew significantly. Modecai, it seems, experienced two decades of stress despite the fact that, fully extended, he was bigger than the UK average. This apparent contradiction does not surprise Angela Gregory, a psychosexual therapist based at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust. “Penis enlargements can be about a lot of things,” she says. “But the amount of anxiety a man experiences rarely, in my experience, correlates with his actual size.”
All this might be leading to more than simple image anxiety; some have pointed to a new mental-health issue they term penile dysmorphic disorder. “It is a minority of men – and we don’t know how many – but it certainly exists and it’s as damaging as any other body dysmorphia,” says Professor David Veale, of King’s College London, an authority on health anxieties. “These men might seek out surgery, and for a few months they will be happy with the results. But then the same anxieties reappear. So, they seek out further surgery. It becomes a circle. But you cannot keep making your penis bigger. This requires therapy.”
When you do Kegel exercises, you can target, train and strengthen your pelvic muscles. “Strengthening your pelvic muscles improves sexual performance, reverses or prevents erectile dysfunction, promotes urinary health (incontinence and overactive bladder), and benefits prostate health by providing increased blood flow,” says Rybchin. “Once you achieve initial pelvic muscle strength, you then add the resistance training — a resistance ring and weights. As you get stronger, you then add the additional weight.”
“My advice to men is that before they try any potions, creams, pumps or surgery, improve your technique. You will feel more confident and women will like you a lot more, at least in the bedroom,” says Dr. David Shusterman, MD, the Medical Director of NY Urology. A lot of men don't invest money into the right products that will improve the outcomes. “At every Duane Reade they have what I call a penis enhancement pack; it includes a penis ring with a vibrator on it. The pack is $10 and it will achieve what the men want to achieve without going through surgery,” says Dr. Shusterman. A lot of men want enhancement but it tends to only hurt your sex life, not help. “Most guys regret going through surgical enhancement,” says Dr. Shusterman.
The challenge was how to properly extract the tissue and also how to resolve three related problems. For a number of years some plastic surgeons performed “fat grafts” as a technique for penile enhancement. However, such approaches were known to eventually deteriorate into a clumpy, unhealthy form. Additionally, the body tended to reabsorb the bulk of that implanted tissue causing a loss of increased size. Finally, the technique offered no opportunity to increase penile length – a common patient request with augmentation.
So in 1997 he pivoted to the penis full-time, flexing his male enhancement chops by answering questions in web forums, Usenet groups and AOL chat rooms. Whatever he didn’t know, he learned, combing medical journals and consulting urologists to base his methodology on sound research. He was frustrated, though, by a dearth of information on natural, exercise-based male enhancement training and says the majority of online communities at the turn of the millenium were only focused on pumping. (Both jelqing and penis pumping force blood to the penis but do so differently. Imagine a tube of toothpaste: Starting at the bottom and squeezing the toothpaste out is jelqing; sucking the toothpaste out is pumping.)
I found that passionate professionalism a bit unnerving to be honest, but then again, I’ve never had weekly strategy sessions about my dick with a stranger. Like, how do you respond to a statement like this before lunch: “Be very careful not to grip the glans during your exercises, Brian. If you need to use some talcum powder to enhance your grip, that would be fine. Remember to update your log.”
Thanks for your insight. I spent hours on research on male enhancement and your site is the first one I’m really happy with. There is an abundance of website on PE, but most list treatment options (mostly surgery, not my preference), facts, but without any feasible recommendations. I think coaching instead of a written guide is exactly what I need, I’ll report back.
However, after more than a century of generally dubious and sometimes lunatic penis enlargement attempts, there's still not much you can do. Sure, there are lots and lots of supposed options out there -- penis pills, creams, brutal stretching exercises, horrific-looking devices, and penis surgery. Almost none of it works. The few approaches that can work often have modest benefits and serious side effects. How serious? In some cases, erectile dysfunction-serious.
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