Thomas Modecai, 37, a teacher from Crewe, has struggled with the size of his penis for most of his life. “When I was 14, I shot up to 6ft but my penis stayed the same,” he says. “I felt like a man with a child’s penis. And it’s affected everything: my relationships, my confidence, even my desire to have children. I worried they might have the same issue.”

that’s quite a lot of products you tried, I’m sorry to hear that you learned it the hard way. A shortcut would be awesome, but there isn’t any, there is no secret growth formula or herb mix, there is no unicorn. Enlargement takes small steps and while some (single ingredient) supplements like the amino acid L-arginine to trigger growth hormone secretion may help a little combined with the right exercises, the scientific proof of an effect is controversial. A lot of websites promote it as a proven solution, but just because a lot of people are writing about it (copying others writing about it), it doesn’t become true. Same for products increasing testosterone. Testosterone is imporant for penis growth till you are an adult, that’s proven, but as an adult, it’s different.
So, does a bigger penis mean better sex? The simple answer is, no, after all, ‘it’s what you do with it that counts’. Regardless of how many times that cliché is used, many men firmly believe that their penis is too small and that if they had a bigger penis, they would have more confidence in relationships and be better lovers. This kind of belief probably expresses much of how you feel about yourself and your body and how you think others perceive you. Often, doubts and feelings of shame and inadequacy about penis shape and size stem from comments bandied about in school changing rooms, during puberty. Furthermore, messages we receive from the media and society can all too often link masculinity, power and virility to penis size, thus re-enforcing this self-doubt and poor body image. If you have wavering self-confidence and poor body image, these kinds of comments can deepen those feelings and lead to the belief that, ‘your penis is inadequate. Therefore, you are inadequate’. Sadly, this kind of misbelief can lead men to avoid dating, relationships and any kind of sexual intimacy, for fear of rejection or humiliation.
There are several surgical treatments, most of which carry a risk of significant complications.[6] Procedures by unlicensed surgeons can lead to serious complications.[7] Risky surgical treatments include subcutaneous fat injection, division of the suspensory ligament, and the injection of dermal fillers, silicone gel, or PMMA.[8][9] The American Urological Association (AUA) and the Urology Care Foundation "consider subcutaneous fat injection for increasing penile girth to be a procedure which has not been shown to be safe or efficacious. The AUA also considers the division of the suspensory ligament of the penis for increasing penile length in adults to be a procedure which has not been shown to be safe or efficacious."[10] Dermal fillers are also not approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in the penis.[11]

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