So, does a bigger penis mean better sex? The simple answer is, no, after all, ‘it’s what you do with it that counts’. Regardless of how many times that cliché is used, many men firmly believe that their penis is too small and that if they had a bigger penis, they would have more confidence in relationships and be better lovers. This kind of belief probably expresses much of how you feel about yourself and your body and how you think others perceive you. Often, doubts and feelings of shame and inadequacy about penis shape and size stem from comments bandied about in school changing rooms, during puberty. Furthermore, messages we receive from the media and society can all too often link masculinity, power and virility to penis size, thus re-enforcing this self-doubt and poor body image. If you have wavering self-confidence and poor body image, these kinds of comments can deepen those feelings and lead to the belief that, ‘your penis is inadequate. Therefore, you are inadequate’. Sadly, this kind of misbelief can lead men to avoid dating, relationships and any kind of sexual intimacy, for fear of rejection or humiliation.
This is not some fanciful idea, or is it theoretical hogwash. Evidence from one study of 367 military personnel, all men, and no one older than 40, found those who felt most satisfied in terms of male genital self-image had lower levels of sexual anxiety and better sexual functioning. And what about the self-doubting ones, those who disliked the appearance of their member? The researchers found the opposite to be true in some (though not all) cases. Dissatisfaction led to anxiety, which led to sexual difficulties — a vicious cycle.
Women who prefer deep vaginal stimulation want larger than average penises [2]. Deep vaginal stimulation is the path to the desirable vaginal orgasm which differs from the clitoral orgasm she can get by herself any time she wants. One study showed that a “considerable percentage” of the women participants felt size of an erection was important [3] for her sexual satisfaction.
It seems every guy either wants to tell you how huge his penis is, or make it bigger than it is. And there are lots of methods out there that claim to be able to help. From drugs and supplements to devices and injections and even surgery, there’s lots of options. But do they actually work, and are they something you want or need to get involved in?

The P-shot or the Priapus shot was named after the Greek god of fertility. The shot was pioneered by Dr Charles Runels, an American MD who specialises in sexuality issues. The patient's blood is withdrawn, processed through a centrifuge to create platelet-rich plasma which contains growth factors. The process is used in sport medicine to rejuvenate torn ligaments. Dr Runels uses it to increase penis size by ten to 20 per cent and improve blood flow for a stronger, harder erection. Runels, the inventor of the Vampire Facelift says, "When I first started doing cosmetic procedures to sculpt the face, it occurred to me that it would be wonderful to do the same thing to the penis."
People get fillers and injections for all sorts of cosmetic reasons, but you can also get injections in your penis. "I have so many patients who come in stressing about the size of their penis when, in reality, the relationship between size and sexual satisfaction is a myth. The average vagina length is 5 inches, which is less than average penis size in America, which is 5.5 inches. What most men don’t realize is that when it comes to sexual satisfaction, girth is more important than length. There are things men can do to enhance their girth but it won’t come in the form of pill, and although penis pumps can improve an erection, they don’t help with overall size. Also, penis exercises are not totally validated to increase size. Sorry guys! But, there are solutions,” says Dr. Muhammad Mirza, sexual men's health expert and founder of ErectileDoctor.com.
Instead of furtively turning to untested methods, men with persistent concerns should consider opening up about them with their doctors. That's because performance problems sometimes act as an early warning signal for serious health problems. Your doctor might be able to prescribe something that can really help, or least provide a valuable dose of perspective about what constitutes "normal" sexual performance.

First of all, we have to define what small really means and what statistics apart from any personal impressions and taste actually say: The flaccid size is irrelevant, some men have a rather small penis growing to enormous size when erect, on the other hand there are men with a rather impressive flaccid penis that just erects itself when aroused and doesn’t grow much in girth or length. Flaccid and erect size don’t correlate.
Big pharma companies don’t publish what’s going on in their secret labs, but we are sure they would come up with some sort of enlargement pill if it would be possible. Viagra was a sensational success for Pfizer, any medication for penile enhancement would become a bestseller, too, a patent worth billions. Doesn’t look like this will ever happen, there is no imaginable way how a pill could increase size.

Pubic hair grooming in men has increased, with recent surveys finding that 50.5% of men surveyed reported regular pubic hair grooming [20]. While men groom their pubic hair for many different reasons, from regular hygiene to making oral sex easier, improved appearance and making the penis look longer were found to be fairly common reasons for male grooming. Trimming pubic hair, particularly around the base of the penis, may give you the appearance of a larger penis.


Thanks for your insight. I spent hours on research on male enhancement and your site is the first one I’m really happy with. There is an abundance of website on PE, but most list treatment options (mostly surgery, not my preference), facts, but without any feasible recommendations. I think coaching instead of a written guide is exactly what I need, I’ll report back.
No herbal remedy can restore erections like Viagra and its prescription counterparts, says Steven Lamm, MD, an assistant professor of medicine at New York University and author of The Hardness Factor. But Lamm says these remedies may be appropriate for men who have experienced a decline in sexual performance but do not suffer from a diagnosable sexual problem. Lamm has endorsed an herbal remedy, marketed under the Roaring Tiger label, that combines horny goat weed and other herbal extracts with the amino acid L-arginine. (The supplements are made by the same company that makes the FastSize Extender.)
If there were any justice in the world this book would have hit the New York Times bestseller list. As what, I don't know. Humor? Non-fiction? Fiction? Pure wicked genius? I got it from the library but I'm going to have to buy a copy for my keeper shelf. Somebody give Mr. Purnell a MacArthur so he can have time to write more brilliant books like this.
Traction is a nonsurgical method to lengthen the penis by employing devices that pull at the glans of the penis for extended periods of time. As of 2013, the majority of research investigating the use of penile traction focuses on treating the curvature and shrinkage of the penis as a result of Peyronie's disease, although some literature exists on the impact on men with short penises.[24]

Lengthening the penis. The most common procedure is to cut the ligament that connects the penis to the pelvic bone. This allows a little more of the shaft -- on average less than an inch -- to become visible outside the body. It's not really lengthening the penis so much as revealing more of what's usually hidden. To prevent the ligament from reattaching, a guy would need weights or stretching devices daily for about six months.
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