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What is important to remember is that there is wide natural variation in penis size, as in height, weight, and many other human physical characteristics. Thus, what may seem small is probably normal. Surgery is fraught with uncertainties about results, and, like other forms of medically “unnecessary” cosmetic surgery, people often have unrealistic expectations and are disappointed as a result.
All consultations with Big Al are done remotely via Skype, which he conducts from his home office in Central Florida (out of earshot of his wife and young kids). His wife is aware of what he does and is totally cool with it, so long as he’s helping people. Which he appears to be doing from the looks of dozens of seemingly legit testimonials on PEGym, a sexual improvement site for men. Dear Ambellina, for example, says he made some “good and easy newbie gains” before hitting a wall, but Big Al kept him motivated to reach his desired length of 7.5 inches. “A huge part of penis enlargement is mental discipline,” Ambellina explains. “A coaching service like Big Al’s is invaluable because you’re much more likely to follow through when a passionate professional is monitoring your progress and pushing you to achieve.”
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The vacuum pump. This is a cylinder that sucks out air. You stick your penis in and the resulting vacuum draws extra blood into it, making it erect and a little bigger. You then clamp off the penis with a tight ring -- like a tourniquet -- to keep the blood from leaking back into your body. What are the drawbacks? The effect only lasts as long as you have the ring on. Using it for more than 20 to 30 minutes can cause tissue damage. This is sometimes used as a treatment for erectile dysfunction, but has not been proven to actually increase the size of the penis.
The fact is verification is sadly lacking for nearly all of the male enhancement products on the market, while in many cases, there are definite warnings against these products. Specifically, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a warning against dietary supplements to enhance male sexual performance, noting many have undisclosed ingredients that may be harmful. This government agency also cautioned against penis enlargers and erection-maintaining rings in at least one public alert.
A high-quality penis sleeve can provide extra length and girth. “It can also be of help when a man has difficulty maintaining an erection. The problem with many sleeves [...] is that they are made of toxic chemicals and/or are porous, so they can hold bacteria and germs, even HPV. If a man is with multiple partners, these would not want to be shared. My client with lifelong ED swears by his silicone sleeve. Even with his penile implant, he says his wife enjoys the extra length,” says Yelverton.

In an offshoot to the FDA crackdown on “male enhancement” pills, an FDA advisory panel concluded Sept. 17 that testosterone replacement therapies should be reserved for men with specific medical conditions that impair testicle function. Prescriptions for "Low T" — as low testosterone is typically described in TV commercials — have surged in recent years as middle-aged men seek to stall the natural effects of aging.

First of all, we have to define what small really means and what statistics apart from any personal impressions and taste actually say: The flaccid size is irrelevant, some men have a rather small penis growing to enormous size when erect, on the other hand there are men with a rather impressive flaccid penis that just erects itself when aroused and doesn’t grow much in girth or length. Flaccid and erect size don’t correlate.

Two urological researchers, Marco Ordera and Paolo Gontero of the University of Turin in Italy, examined outcomes from both surgical and nonsurgical procedures for “male enhancement” in previous studies. Half of the studies involved surgical procedures performed on 121 men; the other half involved nonsurgical enhancement techniques used by 109 men.
How Does it Work? There are a few different types of penis enlargement surgery based on different principles and on the desired outcome. One method is to transplant fatty tissues from elsewhere in the body into the shaft of the penis – this can be successful but is described as being “visually odd”, and the results often disappear within a year as the fat is metabolized. Another technique is to disconnect some supporting ligaments. Reports suggest that this can offer a few fractions of an inch in length, but leave the erection pointing down and not up.

Those who do not like the idea of taking a tablet every day can take liquid supplements. Liquid supplements contain the same ingredients found in the tablets. Instead of taking a single capsule every day, you simply drink a small amount of the liquid. Nutritional supplements come in several flavors, including a traditional flavor and a citrus flavor. You can drink the male enhancement liquid straight from the bottle, but some men prefer mixing the liquid supplement with water or another drink. The liquid products have the same benefits as the tablets and capsules.

Penile size differs between men of different ethnic backgrounds and large studies of penis girth and length have been conducted by condom manufacturers. What many men perceive as a short penis actually falls into normal range size. Based on many published charts, scientific articles, and self reported web based surveys, 95 % of Caucasian men will fall into one of the following categories of size:

Especially strechers are aggressively marketed because manufacturing costs are only about $20 in China and they sell to consumers from $150 up to almost $500. Don’t believe it? Check chinese websites/marketplaces like Alibaba for wholesale prices. A profit margin of up to 2500% is something even many drug lords are envious of, so the companies selling extenders build shiny websites, pay medical personnel for fake testimonials or raving reviews of these useless and dangerous devices.
The surgical treatments, the researchers found, were dangerous and had “unacceptably high rate of complications.” But among the nonsurgical methods, at least one appeared to help grow a man’s member: the “traction method,” in which a penile extender stretched the phallus daily, resulted in average growth of 0.7 in., or 1.8 cm, of the flaccid penis in one study. In another study of the same method, men reported an average increase of 0.9 in. (2.3 cm) in length while flaccid and 0.67 in. (1.7 cm) while erect.
A small penis isn’t more sensitive than a larger one, but surprisingly there is some correlation, many men with a relatively small penis report that they ejaculate prematurely. From the purely medical point of view, this could be conincidence, but not from the psychological. No matter how important or unimportant penis size is for the female partner, men with a smaller penis often feel unsecure, at least subconsciously. Insecurity leads to stress and bodily tension, which encourages coming too fast. This subjective failure causes even more stress the next time, a cycle that’s hard to break. That’s the main reason why penis enlargement often assists in lasting longer in bed, too.

Veale’s theory chimes with the experience of a retired sales manager I meet in a drab Sheffield consultancy room. A lifelong bachelor, Eric Bell, 68, is charming and well-dressed, if, with a beard tinted blue, a touch eccentric. He is also preparing for his third penis enlargement – an operation that, judging from the sizeable member already between his legs, is unnecessary. “I’d just like it a bit fatter here,” he explains, circling thumb and middle finger around the top of his shaft. “I’m single, but it makes me happy knowing I have something eye-opening down there.” We spend five minutes discussing the merits of this before he asks his own question: “Can I put it away now?”
There’s a pill for everything, whether you want to remove stress or ditch some weight. So it should be no surprise that there’s a pill for penis enlargement as well. “Men spend millions on these every year and it is a complete waste of money,” says Tiffany Yelverton, a Sex Educator, Sex Coach, Speaker, and founder of the Sexual Wellness company, Entice Me. “A pill is not going to make the penis larger. Neither are herbs or supplements. It may temporarily make the man feel like he has a stronger erection, but it won't be longer or bigger. Calcium will not increase size or strength and actually too much calcium can cause the opposite effects,” says Yelverton.

It seems every guy either wants to tell you how huge his penis is, or make it bigger than it is. And there are lots of methods out there that claim to be able to help. From drugs and supplements to devices and injections and even surgery, there’s lots of options. But do they actually work, and are they something you want or need to get involved in?
Studies suggest that when erect, the average adult penis measures around 13cm in length and 10cm to 12cm in circumference. It might be comforting to know that a penis that is smaller when flaccid may be a similar length to that of a larger flaccid penis when both are erect. But measuring your penis isn’t going to change its size, so ask yourself, why measure it? Do you think that discovering that your penis is within the ‘average range’ will soothe your anxieties about it being small? What will you do if you discover it is in fact, smaller than average? Unfortunately, many men try to increase their penis size through various interventions that can be invasive, costly and not make a difference to the way they feel about themselves. The solution is more likely to be a change of attitude towards yourself and your penis, namely learning to love what you’ve got.
Because of great risk and uncertainty, medical professionals are generally skeptical of penile enlargement and avoid attempting it.[2][4] Medical doctors do treat micropenis as a medical condition, however, usually by surgery, which can be warranted to improve urinary or sexual function.[5] Most men seeking penis enlargement have normal-size penises, and many may experience penile dysmorphophobia by underestimating their own penis size while overestimating the average size.[5]

ProSolution Plus not only includes herbal and all-natural remedies, but they also include vitamins and minerals shown to help with sexual satisfaction. The product comes with a quality scientific study behind it and seems to be the product that helps the most with premature ejaculation and erection quality at the same time.  Check out our new 2018 review of Pro Solution Plus or click here to order.
While many men worry their penis is too small, research shows that most men's penises are normal and they needn't be concerned. Professor Kevan Wylie, a sexual medicine consultant, says men with concerns about their penis size should consider talking to a health professional before experimenting with treatments, which are mostly ineffective, expensive and potentially harmful.

According to Danoff, most of the “thousands of [products] on the market today rely on the placebo effect.” The well-known placebo effect simply means that “about 40 percent of people,” in Danoff’s words, will report a positive result when given a useless product and told it will work. “When it comes to things sexual, the power of suggestion is overwhelmingly more than what goes on between your legs,” said Danoff, explaining how once you’ve paid your $39.99 for a pill or a device, you’ll be inclined to believe it really works.
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Dr. Dudley Seth Danoff, author of The Ultimate Guide to Male Sexual Health: How To Stay Vital at Any Age, has seen more than 100,000 patients (no exaggeration) over his 30 years as a practicing urologist. According to this graduate of both Princeton and Yale, enhancement is not a common request, but a fair number of patients have asked him, "What can I do to make my penis larger?" Still, as Danoff told Medical Daily, “There isn’t a man alive who wouldn’t like a larger penis.”
Men dealing with erectile dysfunction (ED) have a higher risk of dealing with penile shrinkage. One study that included 1,027 adult men looked at normal adult men and ED patients with no differences in height, race, weight, and age. The ED patients have a significantly shorter penis length, showing an association between ED and shrinkage [29]. Another case-control study also found that both diabetic and nondiabetic men with ED dealt with a decline in penile dimensions, and the decline was even more prevalent in diabetic patients [30]. Working with your doctor to find an effective treatment for ED may help prevent shrinkage due to ED, and if you have comorbidities like diabetes along with ED, effectively managing both may be important to prevent a decline in penile dimensions.
The best ways to make the penis bigger naturally are to lose weight in the groin area and for men to do Kegel exercises. “There is almost as much penis inside the body (as an anchor) as there is visibly outside of the body. When a man loses weight, the exterior portion will actually be longer. I believe it is about 1/2"-1" for every 10 lbs lost. It is why often skinny guys seem to be more well-endowed,” says Yelverton. Kegel exercises strengthen the pelvic floor and the majority of men in studies report longer and stronger erections (which men often equate to size).
The side effects of lengthening surgeries are numerous and include infections, nerve damage, reduced sensitivity, and difficulty getting an erection. Perhaps most disturbing, scarring can leave you with a penis that's shorter than what you started with. Widening the penis is even more controversial. Side effects can be unsightly -- a lumpy, bumpy, uneven penis.
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