Amr Raheem is an andrology specialist (meaning his focus is on medicine relating to men) at University College London Hospitals, as well as a surgeon at International Andrology, a private clinic in the capital. Over the past 15 years, he has carried out more than 250 enlargements. “There is no typical patient,” Raheem says. “All professions, all ethnicities, married, single, gay, straight, rich, poor. It’s across the board. And all ages. I’ve worked on men in their 60s – I don’t know if they go out and use it afterwards. Early 20s, I won’t do. These are still boys. They must get to know it before they change it.”
Stretching with weights. Weights or stretching exercises won't bulk up your penis -- it's not a muscle. But hanging weights off your flaccid penis may stretch it a bit, O'Leary says. The catch is that it requires a freakish degree of dedication. "You might have to wear a weight strapped to your penis eight hours a day for six months," says O'Leary. At the end of it, you could be lucky enough to gain about half an inch. Risks include tearing of the tissue, burst blood vessels, and other problems.
There are several surgical treatments, most of which carry a risk of significant complications.[6] Procedures by unlicensed surgeons can lead to serious complications.[7] Risky surgical treatments include subcutaneous fat injection, division of the suspensory ligament, and the injection of dermal fillers, silicone gel, or PMMA.[8][9] The American Urological Association (AUA) and the Urology Care Foundation "consider subcutaneous fat injection for increasing penile girth to be a procedure which has not been shown to be safe or efficacious. The AUA also considers the division of the suspensory ligament of the penis for increasing penile length in adults to be a procedure which has not been shown to be safe or efficacious."[10] Dermal fillers are also not approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in the penis.[11]

Male Enhancement

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